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MINIMALLY-INVASIVE SURGERY

Minimally-Invasive Surgery (MIS) utilizes the latest technological advancements to help reduce the negative impact of many of the most commonly-performed urologic procedures. MIS includes laparoscopic, or “keyhole” surgery, and robotic surgery. By using long, thin telescopic instruments passed through small, dime-sized incisions, minimally invasive surgeries can be performed in a manner similar to how they would be performed through a traditional open incision.


MIS offers patients the benefit of smaller incisions, shorter hospital stays and recovery times, and more cosmetically appealing results, while providing the same diagnostic and therapeutic benefits as traditional open surgery.








LAPAROSCOPIC ADRENALECTOMY


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About the Procedure:

The adrenal glands are paired organs located just on top of each kidney that secrete hormones. Tumors can arise in the adrenal glands that may require surgical removal. This can be done in a minimally invasive fashion during a laparoscopic adrenalectomy, which helps avoid a large incision, a long hospital stay, long recovery time, and offers more cosmetically appealing results. The procedure is performed using 3 to 4 dime-sized incisions in the abdomen. The procedure usually takes about 3 to 4 hours and you should expect to spend at least 1 night in the hospital.

Preparing for the Procedure:

Take only clear liquids on the day prior to the procedure. Acceptable liquids include tea or coffee (no milk or cream), water, apple juice, Gatorade or other sports drinks, popsicles, italian ice, or chicken broth.

Drink five ounces of citrate of magnesium at 4:00 pm the day before the procedure. If this does not produce a bowel movement by 7:00 pm take an additional 2 ounces of citrate of magnesium. This is available over the counter in the laxative section of your pharmacy. Remember to drink plenty of clear liquids to stay hydrated while preparing for your procedure.

Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the procedure. You should take your usual medications as you normally would the morning of your procedure with a small sip of water only (avoid juice, milk, coffee, etc.).

Starting 5 to 10 days prior to your procedure (ask your doctor for a specific time), it is important to stop taking medications that might increase your risk of bleeding. For a list of blood-thinning medications that should be avoided, click here or ask you doctor.

After the Procedure:

There will be a dressing on the incision that can be removed on the second day after the procedure. After that, it is OK to shower (let soap and water run over the incision, then pat dry), but baths and soaking in a tub should be avoided for 2 weeks after the procedure. The incision should be kept clean and dry to allow it to heal, so it is important to shower once a day. The incision generally heals in five to seven days, but avoid any strenuous activity and exercise or heavy lifting for 4 to 6 weeks after the procedure. Your doctor will remove the surgical staples in your incision at your first office visit following your discharge from the hospital. This is not painful and only takes a few minutes.

It is usually OK to resume your blood-thinning medication the day after your procedure, but check with your doctor to be sure. Take all the medications prescribed by your doctor (including any antibiotics and pain medications), and schedule an appointment to follow up with him within the first 2 weeks after the procedure (ask your doctor if you are unsure when to follow up).

Make arrangements for someone to drive you home on the day of your discharge from the hospital.

LAPAROSCOPIC NEPHRECTOMY

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About the Procedure:

The kidneys are paired organs behind the abdomen that filter blood and create urine. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is the minimally invasive removal of a kidney, usually as a result of a tumor or because the kidney no longer functions. This helps avoid a large incision, a long hospital stay, long recovery time, and offers more cosmetically appealing results. The procedure is done through 3 to 4 dime-sized incisions in the abdomen, and a separate 6 to 7 centimeter incision is made to remove the kidney itself. The procedure usually takes about 3 to 4 hours and you should expect to spend at least 1 night in the hospital.

Preparing for the Procedure:

Take only clear liquids on the day prior to the procedure. Acceptable liquids include tea or coffee (no milk or cream), water, apple juice, Gatorade or other sports drinks, popsicles, italian ice, or chicken broth.

Drink five ounces of citrate of magnesium at 4:00 pm the day before the procedure. If this does not produce a bowel movement by 7:00 pm take an additional 2 ounces of citrate of magnesium. This is available over the counter in the laxative section of your pharmacy. Remember to drink plenty of clear liquids to stay hydrated while preparing for your procedure.

Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the procedure. You should take your usual medications as you normally would the morning of your procedure with a small sip of water only (avoid juice, milk, coffee, etc.).

Starting 5 to 10 days prior to your procedure (ask your doctor for a specific time), it is important to stop taking medications that might increase your risk of bleeding. For a list of blood-thinning medications that should be avoided, click here or ask you doctor.

After the Procedure:

There will be a dressing on the incision that can be removed on the second day after the procedure. After that, it is OK to shower (let soap and water run over the incision, then pat dry), but baths and soaking in a tub should be avoided for 2 weeks after the procedure. The incision should be kept clean and dry to allow it to heal, so it is important to shower once a day. The incision generally heals in five to seven days, but avoid any strenuous activity and exercise or heavy lifting for 4 to 6 weeks after the procedure. Your doctor will remove the surgical staples in your incision at your first office visit following your discharge from the hospital. This is not painful and only takes a few minutes.

It is usually OK to resume your blood-thinning medication the day after your procedure, but check with your doctor to be sure. Take all the medications prescribed by your doctor (including any antibiotics and pain medications), and schedule an appointment to follow up with him within the first 2 weeks after the procedure (ask your doctor if you are unsure when to follow up).

Make arrangements for someone to drive you home on the day of your discharge from the hospital.



LAPAROSCOPIC NEPHROURETERECTOMY

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About the Procedure:

Occasionally, tumors in the kidney may involve the drainage, or collecting system of the kidneys, requiring the removal of the ureter as well as the kidney. This can be done in a minimally invasive fashion during a laparoscopic nephroureterectomy, which helps avoid a large incision, a long hospital stay, long recovery time, and offers more cosmetically appealing results. The kidney and its ureter (drainage tube) are removed using 4 to 5 dime-sized incisions, and an additional 6 to 7 centimeter incision to remove the kidney and ureter intact. The procedure usually takes about 3 to 4 hours and you should expect to spend at least 1 night in the hospital.


Preparing for the Procedure:

Take only clear liquids on the day prior to the procedure. Acceptable liquids include tea or coffee (no milk or cream), water, apple juice, Gatorade or other sports drinks, popsicles, italian ice, or chicken broth.

Drink five ounces of citrate of magnesium at 4:00 pm the day before the procedure. If this does not produce a bowel movement by 7:00 pm take an additional 2 ounces of citrate of magnesium. This is available over the counter in the laxative section of your pharmacy. Remember to drink plenty of clear liquids to stay hydrated while preparing for your procedure.

Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the procedure. You should take your usual medications as you normally would the morning of your procedure with a small sip of water only (avoid juice, milk, coffee, etc.).

Starting 5 to 10 days prior to your procedure (ask your doctor for a specific time), it is important to stop taking medications that might increase your risk of bleeding. For a list of blood-thinning medications that should be avoided, click here or ask you doctor.

After the Procedure:

There will be a dressing on the incision that can be removed on the second day after the procedure. After that, it is OK to shower (let soap and water run over the incision, then pat dry), but baths and soaking in a tub should be avoided for 2 weeks after the procedure. The incision should be kept clean and dry to allow it to heal, so it is important to shower once a day. The incision generally heals in five to seven days, but avoid any strenuous activity and exercise or heavy lifting for 4 to 6 weeks after the procedure. Your doctor will remove the surgical staples in your incision at your first office visit following your discharge from the hospital. This is not painful and only takes a few minutes.

It is usually OK to resume your blood-thinning medication the day after your procedure, but check with your doctor to be sure. Take all the medications prescribed by your doctor (including any antibiotics and pain medications), and schedule an appointment to follow up with him within the first 2 weeks after the procedure (ask your doctor if you are unsure when to follow up).

Make arrangements for someone to drive you home on the day of your discharge from the hospital.

LAPAROSCOPIC PARTIAL NEPHRECTOMY

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About the Procedure:
Occasionally, kidney cancer can be removed without having to remove the entire kidney. This can be done in a minimally invasive fashion during a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, which helps avoid a large incision, a long hospital stay, long recovery time, and offers more cosmetically appealing results. This is accomplished through 3 to 5 dime-sized incisions in the abdomen. The 6 to 7 centimeter incision used during a laparoscopic nephrectomy does not usually need to be made, since there is no need to remove the entire kidney. The procedure usually takes about 3 to 4 hours and you should expect to spend at least 1 night in the hospital.



Preparing for the Procedure:

Take only clear liquids on the day prior to the procedure. Acceptable liquids include tea or coffee (no milk or cream), water, apple juice, Gatorade or other sports drinks, popsicles, italian ice, or chicken broth.

Drink five ounces of citrate of magnesium at 4:00 pm the day before the procedure. If this does not produce a bowel movement by 7:00 pm take an additional 2 ounces of citrate of magnesium. This is available over the counter in the laxative section of your pharmacy. Remember to drink plenty of clear liquids to stay hydrated while preparing for your procedure.

Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the procedure. You should take your usual medications as you normally would the morning of your procedure with a small sip of water only (avoid juice, milk, coffee, etc.).

Starting 5 to 10 days prior to your procedure (ask your doctor for a specific time), it is important to stop taking medications that might increase your risk of bleeding. For a list of blood-thinning medications that should be avoided, click here or ask you doctor.

After the Procedure:

There will be a dressing on the incision that can be removed on the second day after the procedure. After that, it is OK to shower (let soap and water run over the incision, then pat dry), but baths and soaking in a tub should be avoided for 2 weeks after the procedure. The incision should be kept clean and dry to allow it to heal, so it is important to shower once a day. The incision generally heals in five to seven days, but avoid any strenuous activity and exercise or heavy lifting for 4 to 6 weeks after the procedure. Your doctor will remove the surgical staples in your incision at your first office visit following your discharge from the hospital. This is not painful and only takes a few minutes.

It is usually OK to resume your blood-thinning medication the day after your procedure, but check with your doctor to be sure. Take all the medications prescribed by your doctor (including any antibiotics and pain medications), and schedule an appointment to follow up with him within the first 2 weeks after the procedure (ask your doctor if you are unsure when to follow up).

Make arrangements for someone to drive you home on the day of your discharge from the hospital.

LAPAROSCOPIC RENAL CRYOBLATION

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About the Procedure:

Occasionally, kidney cancer can be treated without having to remove the entire kidney. While some tumors can be removed during a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, some are not safe to remove in this manner. However, by applying a probe to the tumor during laparoscopy, it can be frozen, destroying the cancer in the process. After exposing the kidney tumor using 3 to 4 dime-sized incisions, a probe is inserted into the tumor, freezing it and the cancer. The rest of the kidney is unaffected and undamaged. The procedure usually takes about 3 to 4 hours and you should expect to spend at least 1 night in the hospital.


Preparing for the Procedure:

Take only clear liquids on the day prior to the procedure. Acceptable liquids include tea or coffee (no milk or cream), water, apple juice, Gatorade or other sports drinks, popsicles, italian ice, or chicken broth.

Drink five ounces of citrate of magnesium at 4:00 pm the day before the procedure. If this does not produce a bowel movement by 7:00 pm take an additional 2 ounces of citrate of magnesium. This is available over the counter in the laxative section of your pharmacy. Remember to drink plenty of clear liquids to stay hydrated while preparing for your procedure.

Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the procedure. You should take your usual medications as you normally would the morning of your procedure with a small sip of water only (avoid juice, milk, coffee, etc.).

Starting 5 to 10 days prior to your procedure (ask your doctor for a specific time), it is important to stop taking medications that might increase your risk of bleeding. For a list of blood-thinning medications that should be avoided, click here or ask you doctor.

After the Procedure:

There will be a dressing on the incision that can be removed on the second day after the procedure. After that, it is OK to shower (let soap and water run over the incision, then pat dry), but baths and soaking in a tub should be avoided for 2 weeks after the procedure. The incision should be kept clean and dry to allow it to heal, so it is important to shower once a day. The incision generally heals in five to seven days, but avoid any strenuous activity and exercise or heavy lifting for 4 to 6 weeks after the procedure. Your doctor will remove the surgical staples in your incision at your first office visit following your discharge from the hospital. This is not painful and only takes a few minutes.

It is usually OK to resume your blood-thinning medicationn the day after your procedure, but check with your doctor to be sure. Take all the medications prescribed by your doctor (including any antibiotics and pain medications), and schedule an appointment to follow up with him within the first 2 weeks after the procedure (ask your doctor if you are unsure when to follow up).

Make arrangements for someone to drive you home on the day of your discharge from the hospital.

LAPAROSCOPIC URETEROPELVIC JUNCTION (UPJ) OBSTRUCTION REPAIR

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About the Procedure:

If the junction between the kidney and its drainage tube, the ureter, has a narrowing causing the flow of urine to be obstructed, this can sometimes be repaired in a minimally invasive fashion. Done laparoscopically, UPJ obstruction repair helps avoid a large incision, a long hospital stay, long recovery time, and offers more cosmetically appealing results. This is accomplished through 3 to 5 dime-sized incisions in the abdomen. The procedure usually takes about 3 to 4 hours and you should expect to spend at least 1 night in the hospital. After the procedure, your doctor may leave a stent, or plastic drainage tube, in your body to help the repair heal. This will need to be removed by your doctor at a later date, so you must remember to follow up when you are scheduled to do so.


Preparing for the Procedure:

Take only clear liquids on the day prior to the procedure. Acceptable liquids include tea or coffee (no milk or cream), water, apple juice, Gatorade or other sports drinks, popsicles, italian ice, or chicken broth.

Drink five ounces of citrate of magnesium at 4:00 pm the day before the procedure. If this does not produce a bowel movement by 7:00 pm take an additional 2 ounces of citrate of magnesium. This is available over the counter in the laxative section of your pharmacy. Remember to drink plenty of clear liquids to stay hydrated while preparing for your procedure.

Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the procedure. You should take your usual medications as you normally would the morning of your procedure with a small sip of water only (avoid juice, milk, coffee, etc.).

Starting 5 to 10 days prior to your procedure (ask your doctor for a specific time), it is important to stop taking medications that might increase your risk of bleeding. For a list of blood-thinning medications that should be avoided, click here or ask you doctor.

After the Procedure:

There will be a dressing on the incision that can be removed on the second day after the procedure. After that, it is OK to shower (let soap and water run over the incision, then pat dry), but baths and soaking in a tub should be avoided for 2 weeks after the procedure. The incision should be kept clean and dry to allow it to heal, so it is important to shower once a day. The incision generally heals in five to seven days, but avoid any strenuous activity and exercise or heavy lifting for 4 to 6 weeks after the procedure. Your doctor will remove the surgical staples in your incision at your first office visit following your discharge from the hospital. This is not painful and only takes a few minutes.

It is usually OK to resume your blood-thinning medication the day after your procedure, but check with your doctor to be sure. Take all the medications prescribed by your doctor (including any antibiotics and pain medications), and schedule an appointment to follow up with him within the first 2 weeks after the procedure (ask your doctor if you are unsure when to follow up).

Make arrangements for someone to drive you home on the day of your discharge from the hospital.

LAPAROSCOPIC RETROPERITONEAL OR PELVIC LYMPH NODE REMOVAL


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About the Procedure:

In some men with testicular or prostate cancer, the lymph nodes in the abdomen or pelvis may need to be removed. This can be done in a minimally invasive fashion during a laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, which helps avoid a large incision, a long hospital stay, long recovery time, and offers more cosmetically appealing results. This is usually done through 4 to 5 dime-sized incisions on the abdomen. The procedure usually takes about 3 to 4 hours and you should expect to spend at least 1 night in the hospital.

Preparing for the Procedure:

Take only clear liquids on the day prior to the procedure. Acceptable liquids include tea or coffee (no milk or cream), water, apple juice, Gatorade or other sports drinks, popsicles, italian ice, or chicken broth.

Drink five ounces of citrate of magnesium at 4:00 pm the day before the procedure. If this does not produce a bowel movement by 7:00 pm take an additional 2 ounces of citrate of magnesium. This is available over the counter in the laxative section of your pharmacy. Remember to drink plenty of clear liquids to stay hydrated while preparing for your procedure.

Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the procedure. You should take your usual medications as you normally would the morning of your procedure with a small sip of water only (avoid juice, milk, coffee, etc.).

Starting 5 to 10 days prior to your procedure (ask your doctor for a specific time), it is important to stop taking medications that might increase your risk of bleeding. For a list of blood-thinning medications that should be avoided, click here or ask you doctor.

After the Procedure:

There will be a dressing on the incision that can be removed on the second day after the procedure. After that, it is OK to shower (let soap and water run over the incision, then pat dry), but baths and soaking in a tub should be avoided for 2 weeks after the procedure. The incision should be kept clean and dry to allow it to heal, so it is important to shower once a day. The incision generally heals in five to seven days, but avoid any strenuous activity and exercise or heavy lifting for 4 to 6 weeks after the procedure. Your doctor will remove the surgical staples in your incision at your first office visit following your discharge from the hospital. This is not painful and only takes a few minutes.

It is usually OK to resume your blood-thinning medication the day after your procedure, but check with your doctor to be sure. Take all the medications prescribed by your doctor (including any antibiotics and pain medications), and schedule an appointment to follow up with him within the first 2 weeks after the procedure (ask your doctor if you are unsure when to follow up).

Make arrangements for someone to drive you home on the day of your discharge from the hospital.

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